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CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3 Write Narratives To...

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3 - Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3.a - Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3.b - Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3.c - Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3.d - Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events.

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3.e - Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

 
Authors: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers

Title: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3 Write Narratives To Develop Real Or Imagined Experiences... Writing - 6th Grade English Language Arts Common Core State Standards

Publisher: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington D.C.

Copyright Date: 2010

(Page last edited 10/08/2017)

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Internet4classrooms is a collaborative effort by Susan Brooks and Bill Byles.
 

  

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