Quantcast
Sign Up For Our Newsletter
Email:

I4C

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2 Write...

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2 - Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2.a - Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2.b - Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2.c - Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2.d - Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2.e - Establish and maintain a formal style.

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2.f - Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the information or explanation presented.

 
Authors: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers

Title: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2 Write Informative/explanatory Texts To Examine A Topic And Convey... Writing - 6th Grade English Language Arts Common Core State Standards

Publisher: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington D.C.

Copyright Date: 2010

(Page last edited 10/08/2017)

  1. A chart of the transitional devices - Also called conjunctive adverbs or adverbial conjunctions
  2. Adverb Clauses: Cause and Effect Relationships - Complete the statement to create a cause and effect
  3. Analyzing Advice as an Introduction to Shakespeare - Students read and analyze the advice given in Mary Schmich's 1997 Chicago Tribune column "Advice, Like Youth, Probably Just Wasted on the Young," which inspired the popular recording "Everybodys Free (to Wear Sunscreen)" by Baz Luhrmann. Exploring the column and its recording, students focus on both content and style through the use of central questions.
  4. Biography Project: Research and Class Presentation - As students give the class presentations, have other students use the Oral Presentation Peer Feedback Form to write their feedback.
  5. Book Reviews, Annotation, and Web Technology - Students work in groups to read and discuss a book, keeping track of their feelings and opinions about the book, as well as facts and quotations, as they read. After reading, each group goes through their notes on the book, marking items they want to include in a book review. They look at sample book reviews and discuss the common elements of book reviews. Next, each group works together to write a review of their book and use Web-authoring tools to publish the review onto a Web page. Students then decide which parts of their review they wish to annotate, with each student in the group responsible for one topic. Students research their topics, taking notes. Each student writes about his or her topic, including bibliographic information. The writings are then peer-reviewed by the group, published to the Web, and hyperlinked back to the group's book review.
  6. Can Animals Think? - The Can Animals Think? task is embedded in a 3-4 week unit that uses the topic of animal cognition as a means to teach students how to analyze and navigate informational texts as well as study the purposeful decisions an author makes to best convey his/her point of view in writing.
  7. Cause and Effect - Quia Quiz
  8. Cause and Effect Diagrams - Lesson showing how to think through causes of a problem
  9. Cause and Effect Essay - How to write a cause and effect essay
  10. Cause and Effect Graphic Organizers - Print these to practice this skill.
  11. Cause and Effect Quiz - Quiz 1
  12. Cause and Effect Sheet - Read passage online and answer questions on paper
  13. Cause and Effect Transitions - Combine two sentences using connecting words to show cause and effect.
  14. Compare and Contrast Electronic Text With Traditionally Printed Text - During this lesson, students compare and contrast the characteristics of electronic text with the characteristics of traditionally printed text, gaining a deeper understanding of how to navigate and comprehend information found on the Internet.
  15. Comparing and Contrasting: Picturing an Organizational Pattern - This lesson is designed to be used during a unit when students are writing a comparison/contrast paper. It will be most helpful prior to drafting, but it could also be useful during revision
  16. Doodle Splash: Using Graphics to Discuss Literature - As students read a short story, they "doodle," either in a journal or using an online tool, responding to the text through images, symbols, shapes, and colors. They must be sure to represent all of the elements of the short story (setting, plot, character, point of view, theme) in their doodles.
  17. Dynamic Duo Text Talks: Examining the Content of Internet Sites - While this lesson makes use of websites about Anne Frank and the Holocaust, teachers can easily adapt the activities to a variety of topics. Guided by the questions on the Observation and Inquiry Sheet provided, students work together to explore several online texts on the chosen topic.
  18. Effective Conclusions - Article with ideas for concluding a speech
  19. Entering History: Nikki Giovanni and Martin Luther King, Jr. - Students read Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech in conjunction with Nikki Giovanni's poem "The Funeral of Martin Luther King, Jr." in order to better understand the speech and the impact it had both on observers like Giovanni during the Civil Rights Movement and on Americans today.
  20. Exploring and Sharing Family Stories - In this lesson, students are encouraged to explore the idea of memory in both large- and small-group settings. Students access their own life experiences and then discuss family stories they have heard. After choosing a family member to interview, students create questions, interview their relative, and write a personal narrative that describes not only the answers to their questions but their own reactions to these responses. These narratives are peer reviewed and can be published as a class magazine or a website.
  21. Exploring Author's Voice Using Jane Addams Award-Winning Books - This lesson uses Jane Addams Award-winning books to explore author's voice and style.
  22. Fairy Tale Autobiographies - Students work together in small groups to read, discuss, and analyze fairy tales. After compiling a list of common elements, students collaborate on their own original fairy talesbased on events from their own lives or the lives of someone they know.
  23. Five Effective Strategies to Conclude a Speech - Speech conclusion tutorial including strategies and speech topics for an effective way to conclude your public speaking speech
  24. Found Poems/Parallel Poems - In this lesson, students compose found and parallel poems based on descriptive literary passages they have read.
  25. He Said/She Said: Analyzing Gender Roles through Dialogue - This lesson has students brainstorm some gender stereotypes, find examples in popular culture, and discuss how the stereotypes affect their lives.
  26. Heroes Around Us - Students will explore the distinction between a hero and an idol. Based on collaboratively established criteria for heroism and characteristics of heroes, students will select, read about, and report on a hero. Students will identify how their hero matches their criteria and characteristics.
  27. Imagine That! Playing with Genre through Newspapers and Short Stories - This lesson uses narrative structures to introduce students to one form of expository writingnews briefs and articles. By condensing a short story into a newspaper article and expanding an article into a short story, students will explore the ways that exposition differs from narration.
  28. Let It Grow: An Inquiry-Based Organic Gardening Research Project - This project motivates students to learn about organic gardening by developing their own research questions, conducting research, and gardening at their school. They then create signs about their plants and present their research to the class so that other students can learn about each plant.
  29. Making an Argument: Effective use of Transition Words - Lesson plan; "explore and understand the use of transition words in context and write their own persuasive essay using transition words"
  30. Making Personal and Cultural Connections Using A Girl Named Disaster - This lesson is intended to help students experience both efferent (reading for information) and aesthetic (reading as a personal, emotional experience) responses to the story A Girl Named Disaster by Nancy Farmer.
  31. Modes of Writing - Definitions of various modes of writing
  32. Performing Poetry and Building Meaning - Through the use of dramatic reading and the exploration of Internet resources, sixth through eighth grade students build a greater understanding of poetry and the poet's voice.
  33. Plan Your Conclusion - Four major components to a good conclusion
  34. Practice with Cause and Effect - Multiple Choice quiz
  35. Preparing & Delivering Effective Presentations: Helpful Hints - This twenty slide show includes an Audience Bill of Rights
  36. Proverbs: An Introduction - In this lesson, students learn about proverbs: how they work, how they differ from clich? how to interpret them, and how they can be culturally and personally significant.
  37. Proverbs: Contemporary Proverbs - This lesson challenges students to craft more apparent meanings for traditional maxims. They first search for proverbs from around the world and select several they like. They then update the proverbs to be more contemporary. Finally, they write new proverbs of their own.
  38. Purposes in Writing - Explanation of various purposes from writers' point of view
  39. Reading and Writing Workshop: Freak the Mighty - This unit revolves around Rodman Philbrick's Freak the Mighty. Lessons include teaching and practicing pre-, during, and after reading comprehension strategies.
  40. Scaling Back to Essentials: Scaffolding Summarization With Fishbone Mapping - Complete fishbone maps that highlight the main ideas and relevant details from a cause-effect text; lesson plan
  41. The History Behind Song Lyrics - In this lesson, students research and categorize items from the song as well as illustrate their historical relevance. Students use an online chart to display their research.
  42. The Reading Performance: Understanding Fluency Through Oral Interpretation - This lesson examines how oral reading of poetry may be useful in supporting fluency for sixth- through eighth-grade students. Central to this lesson is the idea that students require practice and repetition to master decoding skills for fluency and comprehension in oral reading.
  43. Transitional Devices - Transitional guides are connectives (symbols, words, phrases; sometimes whole sentences and paragraphs) that make possible a smooth "passing over" from one idea to the next.
  44. Transitional Devices (Connecting Words) - Brought to you by the Purdue University Online Writing Lab
  45. Understanding different purposes - Communicate successfully to your audience
  46. Using QARs to Develop Comprehension and Reflective Reading Habits - Middle school is a time when students move from reading for literal comprehension to developing inferential comprehension strategies. This lesson provides a foundation for building reflective reading habits, which enables students to develop these higher-level comprehension strategies.
  47. Using Transitions - Gap-fill exercise
  48. Using Transitions - Interactive PowerPoint show by Ruth Luman
  49. Writing a How-To Explanation - Student model
  50. Writing a Personal Narrative - Student model
  51. Writing a Persuasive Essay - Student model
  52. Writing Free Verse in the "Voice" of Cesar Chavez - This lesson gives students the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the characteristics of free verse and to write a free verse poem using written material about the labor activist Cesar Chavez.
  53. You can customize the lesson, if desired, to promote reading any time of the year. - In this lesson, students first explore resumes using the internet. They then work as a class to construct a sample resume for a character in a book they have all read. Next, they explore want ads and online job sites for possible jobs for a character from a book they have read on their own. They write a letter of application and create a resume for their character for the selected job.

 

 

Internet4classrooms is a collaborative effort by Susan Brooks and Bill Byles.
 

  

advertisement

advertisement

Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy

397933394 US 1 desktop not tablet not iPad device-width