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CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.7 Conduct Short...

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.7 - Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate.

 
Authors: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers

Title: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.7 Conduct Short Research Projects To Answer A Question,... Writing - 6th Grade English Language Arts Common Core State Standards

Publisher: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington D.C.

Copyright Date: 2010

(Page last edited 10/08/2017)

  1. Action Is Character: Exploring Character Traits with Adjectives - In this lesson, students analyze the character while also enriching their vocabulary by "becoming" a character in a novel they have read and making lists from that character's perspective.
  2. Biography Project: Research and Class Presentation - As students give the class presentations, have other students use the Oral Presentation Peer Feedback Form to write their feedback.
  3. Book Reviews, Annotation, and Web Technology - Students work in groups to read and discuss a book, keeping track of their feelings and opinions about the book, as well as facts and quotations, as they read. After reading, each group goes through their notes on the book, marking items they want to include in a book review. They look at sample book reviews and discuss the common elements of book reviews. Next, each group works together to write a review of their book and use Web-authoring tools to publish the review onto a Web page. Students then decide which parts of their review they wish to annotate, with each student in the group responsible for one topic. Students research their topics, taking notes. Each student writes about his or her topic, including bibliographic information. The writings are then peer-reviewed by the group, published to the Web, and hyperlinked back to the group's book review.
  4. Campaigning for Fair Use: Public Service Announcements on Copyright Awareness - Who owns what you compose? Who controls what happens with the words, images, music, sounds, videos that you create? What rights do you have to use other peoples compositions? This unit plan focuses on helping students find answers to these questions. Students explore a range of resources on fair use and copyright then design their own audio public service announcements (PSAs), to be broadcast over the schools public address system.
  5. Critical Evaluation of Resources - In the research process you will encounter many types of resources including books, articles and web sites. But not everything you find on your topic will be suitable. How do you make sense of what is out there and evaluate its authority and appropriateness for your research?
  6. Critically Analyzing Information Sources - The emphasis here is on print sources
  7. Dynamic Duo Text Talks: Examining the Content of Internet Sites - While this lesson makes use of websites about Anne Frank and the Holocaust, teachers can easily adapt the activities to a variety of topics. Guided by the questions on the Observation and Inquiry Sheet provided, students work together to explore several online texts on the chosen topic.
  8. Energy Pioneers - This activity is designed to introduce students to many of the scientists and inventors who have contributed to the development of todays modern energy systems. Students may also be exposed to the developments that are being made in the technology of renewable energy.
  9. Evaluating Information Found on the Internet - Items to Consider
  10. Evaluating Information Found on the Internet - A thoughtful guide to evaluating web and other Internet resources
  11. Evaluating Information Found on the World Wide Web - Explanation and activities
  12. Evaluating Internet Research Sources - Scroll near the bottom of the page to find a Checklist for Research Source Evaluation
  13. Evaluating Web Pages - Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask
  14. Evaluation of Information Sources - This page contains pointers to criteria for evaluating information resources, particularly those on the Internet.
  15. Evaluation of Information Sources from the Web - Critically evaluate a Web page for authenticity, applicability, authorship, bias, and usability
  16. Heroes Around Us - Students will explore the distinction between a hero and an idol. Based on collaboratively established criteria for heroism and characteristics of heroes, students will select, read about, and report on a hero. Students will identify how their hero matches their criteria and characteristics.
  17. Let It Grow: An Inquiry-Based Organic Gardening Research Project - This project motivates students to learn about organic gardening by developing their own research questions, conducting research, and gardening at their school. They then create signs about their plants and present their research to the class so that other students can learn about each plant.
  18. Making Personal and Cultural Connections Using A Girl Named Disaster - This lesson is intended to help students experience both efferent (reading for information) and aesthetic (reading as a personal, emotional experience) responses to the story A Girl Named Disaster by Nancy Farmer.
  19. Myth and Truth: The "First Thanksgiving" - By exploring myths surrounding the Wampanoag, the pilgrims, and the "first Thanksgiving," this lesson asks students to think critically about commonly believed myths regarding the Wampanoag Indians in colonial America.
  20. Practical Steps in Evaluating Internet Resources - This document will give you a variety of ways to look for each kind of information.
  21. Press Conference for Bud, Not Buddy - This lesson can be used after the reading of Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis. The lesson encourages students to use higher level thinking skills and asks them to examine different character perspectives. Students demonstrate comprehension of the story by actively involving themselves in group and whole-class discussions.
  22. Quality Information Check List - A resource to help young people evaluate the information they find on the Internet.
  23. Story Character Homepage - Combine higher order thinking with creativity in this lesson that uses diamante poems to illustrate the phenomenon of cause and effect. Students define and identify instances of cause and effect to help them generate their own examples.
  24. Teaching Zack to Think - It is essential that students learn how to validate information. (from Alan November)
  25. The ABC's of Web Site Evaluation - Evaluation of Web sites is an important skill to learn in this age of digital and information literacy. Students and teachers need practice in critically examining sites to determine authority, authenticity, and applicability to purpose. This site provides that practice. (presented by Kathy Schrock)
  26. The Good, The Bad & The Ugly - Why It's a Good Idea to Evaluate Web Sources
  27. The History Behind Song Lyrics - In this lesson, students research and categorize items from the song as well as illustrate their historical relevance. Students use an online chart to display their research.
  28. You can customize the lesson, if desired, to promote reading any time of the year. - In this lesson, students first explore resumes using the internet. They then work as a class to construct a sample resume for a character in a book they have all read. Next, they explore want ads and online job sites for possible jobs for a character from a book they have read on their own. They write a letter of application and create a resume for their character for the selected job.

 

 

Internet4classrooms is a collaborative effort by Susan Brooks and Bill Byles.
 

  

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