Internet4Classrooms - Helping Teachers Use the Internet Effectively  
Assessment Assistance | On-Line Practice Modules | Daily Dose of the Web | Grade Level Help  Links for K-12 Teachers
Custom Search

Standards listed on this page are from Texas Language Arts Knowledge & Skills - 7th Grade
Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape. Do not copy content from the page. Plagiarism will be detected by Copyscape.
Listening | Reading | Writing | Viewing
Page last edited 5/8/2009
Return to Grade Level Skills

A resource for the teacher to use in planning their lessons a site for teachers | A PowerPoint show related to this standard a PowerPoint show | An Adobe Acrobat document in .pdf format Adobe Acrobat document | A Microsoft Word document to be downloaded a Word document
This resource includes voice instructions for students sound | A video is available through this link video format
| Interactive interactive lesson | This site includes questions for your students to check their understanding a quiz | A lesson plan can be found at this site lesson plan | This link includes something for the teacher to print to print
Listening/Speaking

(1) Purposes - The student listens actively and purposefully in a variety of settings.

(A)  determine the purposes for listening such as to gain information, to solve problems, or to enjoy and appreciate

 
(B)  eliminate barriers to effective listening
 
(C)  understand the major ideas and supporting evidence in spoken messages
 
(D)  listen to learn by taking notes, organizing, and summarizing spoken ideas
 

(2) Critical Listening - The student listens critically to analyze and evaluate a speaker's message(s).

(A)  interpret speakers' messages (both verbal and nonverbal), purposes, and perspectives

 
(B)  analyze a speaker's persuasive techniques and credibility
 
(C)  distinguish between the speaker's opinion and verifiable fact
 
(D)  monitor his/her own understanding of the spoken message and seek clarification as needed
 
(E)  compare his/her own perception of a spoken message with the perception of others
 
(F)  evaluate a spoken message in terms of its content, credibility, and delivery
 

(3) Appreciation - The student listens to enjoy and appreciate spoken language.

(A)  listen to proficient, fluent models of oral reading, including selections from classic and contemporary works

  1. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll - A twelve-chapter performance in RealAudio by the Wired for Books Players
  2. Cinderella 26 min (MP3 format) - read the story yourself
  3. The Emperor's New Clothes 12 min (MP# format) - read the story yourself
  4. How the Leopard Got His Spots 12 min (MP3 format) - read the story yourself
  5. The Light Princess 92 min (MP3 format) - read the story yourself
  6. The Little Mermaid 51 min (MP3 format) - read the story yourself
  7. Reading Lounge -"Three children's books are animated online, with readings and/or introductions by a variety of players and Spike Lee. Students love to see their favorite Knicks players read aloud to them, and they can also read along with the narrator in the captioned version"
  8. The Story of Snow White 20 min (MP3 format) - read the story yourself
  9. Other Audio Stories
  10. Other stories for children - look for stories with the audio icon
(B)  analyze oral interpretations of literature for effects on the listener
 
(C)  analyze the use of aesthetic language for its effects
 

(4) Culture - The student listens and speaks to gain and share knowledge of his/her own culture, the culture of others, and the common elements of culture.

(A)  connect his/her own experiences, information, insights, and ideas with the experiences of others through speaking and listening

 
(B)  compare oral traditions across regions and cultures
  1. American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936 - 1940
  2. Circle of Stories - Learn about the storytellers and their tribes, or read and listen to their stories.
  3. Iroquois Oral Traditions
  4. Ojibwe Oral Traditions
(C)  identify how language use such as labels and sayings reflects regions and cultures
 

(5) Audiences - The student speaks clearly and appropriately to different audiences for different purposes and occasions.

(A)  adapt spoken language such as word choice, diction, and usage to the audience, purpose, and occasion

 
(B)  demonstrate effective communications skills that reflect such demands as interviewing, reporting, requesting, and providing information
 
(C)  present dramatic interpretations of experiences, stories, poems, or plays to communicate
 
(D)  generate criteria to evaluate his/her own oral presentations and the presentations of others
 
(E)  use effective rate, volume, pitch, and tone for the audience and setting
 
(F)  clarify and support spoken ideas with evidence, elaborations, and examples
 

Reading

(6) Word Identification - The student uses a variety of word recognition strategies.

(A)  apply knowledge of letter-sound correspondences, language structure, and context to recognize words

  1. Context Clues - Click on Number 13. Video Lesson and Interactive Quiz.
  2. Context Clues - Teacher lesson and blackline masters to print. PDF files
  3. Direct Definition Context Clues - A lesson in remembering which clue words help interpret the text. Seven key words are introduced and examples are shown of each to clarify what to look for when dealing with context clues. A very good review lesson for 3rd and up.
  4. Direct Context Clues Teaching Material - Here you will find a review lesson and worksheets to go along with the lesson as well as flash cards to review clue words that will help in interpreting text.
  5. Inferential Context Clues - Some students get upset when the teacher states, "The answer is right there!" This site reviews how clues appear where the meaning is hidden in the rest of the words in the sentence. An brief interactive quiz helps assure understanding.
  6. Context Clues - Quia quiz
(B)  use structural analysis to identify words, including knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and prefixes/suffixes
  1. Rootonym - Level 1 | Level 2 | Level 3 - studying the roots/cells: cess/ced, cept/cip and cur.
  2. Rooty's Weekly Root - Three Rootonym® puzzles per week with 4 words per puzzle
  3. Synonym Match Game one- Concentration style Game Two - Game Three Interactive
  4. Synonym & Antonym Word Encounters - Level 1 words | Level 2 words | Level 3 words Interactive
(C)  locate the meanings, pronunciations, and derivations of unfamiliar words using dictionaries, glossaries, and other sources
  1. Antonym Practice - look up these words to find the meanings and identify the antonym.
  2. Ask Dr. Dictionary - Look up a word, or look at the Doctor's links to other dictionary sites on the web.
  3. Captions Help Tell the Story – students look at three pictures and try to determine which caption fits best Interactive
  4. FreeDictionary - Has word of the day, quote of the day, article of the day, word game of the day and more.
  5. Roget's Thesaurus Search Form
  6. Rhyming Dictionary - You can use it to help write poetry, song lyrics, greeting cards, witticisms, and more.
  7. Say it Another Way - Fill in the blank with a synonym for the missing word. Interactive
  8. Specialized On-Line Dictionaries in one of 60 areas, from Advertising to Travel.
  9. Synonym.com - type a word in the box and find a synonym, or antonym, of the word.
  10. Synonym & Antonym Word Encounters - Level 1 words | Level 2 words | Level 3 words Interactive
  11. Synonymical: The Synonym Game - [this link opens on a new page] click to select the letters (one at a time) that spell the proper synonym. (Author - David Fisco) Interactive
  12. The Thesaurus - a reference book that lists words and their synonyms - Drag and drop the words to the right thesaurus entry. Interactive
  13. Word Central from Merriam Webster - a customizable dictionary and a daily buzz word
  14. WWWebster's Online Dictionary look up a word or a phrase
  15. YourDictionary.com - This site says that it is the web's most authoritative and comprehensive language portal

(7) Fluency - The student reads with fluency and understanding in texts at appropriate difficulty levels.

(A)  read regularly in independent-level materials (texts in which no more than approximately 1 in 20 words is difficult for the reader)

 
(B)  read regularly in instructional-level materials that are challenging but manageable (texts in which no more than approximately 1 in 10 words is difficult for the reader)
 
(C)  adjust reading rate based on purposes for reading
 
(D)  read aloud in selected texts in ways that both reflect understanding of the text and engage the listeners (D)  read aloud in selected texts in ways that both reflect understanding of the text and engage the listeners
 
(E)  read silently with increasing ease for longer periods
 

(8) Variety of Texts - The student reads widely for different purposes in varied sources.

(A)  read classic and contemporary works

  1. Audio Books - Classics - download some of the classics (MP3 or iPod)
  2. Audio Books - Librivox - LibriVox provides free audio books from the public domain.
  3. Shakespeare - The Complete Works of William Shakespeare
  4. Twain - Mark Twain in his times - This site provides the capability of searching for reviews or electronic texts.
(B)  select varied sources such as plays, anthologies, novels, textbooks, poetry, newspapers, manuals, and electronic texts when reading for information or pleasure
  1. This is a PowerPoint showAn Overview of Poetry - a comprehensive show on the topic of rhythm and rhyme
  2. News Stories with Comprehension Quizzes [from the BBC] - (1) White loafers and passport control, (2) Hungry ferrett causes rail scare, (3) Dyslexic boy's site wins top award, (4) Otters head for towns and cities, (5) Demolition fears after city blaze.
    1. News Quiz Archive - over 50 news stories from the BBC - Choose carefully, not all of these would be appropriate for 7th grade students. Also, take a look at a section of stories which include math in the news and the quiz
(C)  read for varied purposes such as to be informed, to be entertained, to appreciate the writer's craft, and to discover models for his/her own writing
  1. Looking for the Fine Print - students read advertisements to practice reading critically Interactive
  2. Questioning Toolkit - seventeen types of questions from the educational journal, FNO
  3. Questions to Ask Yourself While Reading - One of the first steps to writing an effective critical essay is to carefully read the work itself
(D)  read to take action such as to complete forms, make informed recommendations, and write a response
  1. Read a Contract - and answer questions

(9) Vocabulary Development - The student acquires an extensive vocabulary through reading and systematic word study.

(A)  develop vocabulary by listening to selections read aloud

  1. Cinderella 26 min (MP3 format) - read the story yourself
  2. The Emperor's New Clothes 12 min (MP# format) - read the story yourself
  3. How the Leopard Got His Spots 12 min (MP3 format) - read the story yourself
  4. The Light Princess 92 min (MP3 format) - read the story yourself
  5. The Little Mermaid 51 min (MP3 format) - read the story yourself
  6. The Story of Snow White 20 min (MP3 format) - read the story yourself
  7. Other Audio Stories
(B)  draw on experiences to bring meanings to words in context such as interpreting figurative language idioms, multiple-meaning words, and analogies
  1. Analogy links - below
  2. Context is the Key - students use context clues to determine the meaning of a word Interactive
  3. Say it Another Way - Fill in the blank with a synonym for the missing word. Interactive
  4. Using Multiple Meanings - students decide which sentences use a word correctly Interactive
  5. Vocabulary University - acquire and retain vocabulary.
  6. Words with multiple meanings - students fill in the blanks from a word list Interactive
(C)  use multiple reference aids, including a thesaurus, a synonym finder, a dictionary, and software, to clarify meaning and usage
  1. Ask Dr. Dictionary - Look up a word, or look at the Doctor's links to other dictionary sites on the web.
  2. FreeDictionary - Has word of the day, quote of the day, article of the day, word game of the day and more.
  3. Roget's Thesaurus Search Form
  4. Rhyming Dictionary - You can use it to help write poetry, song lyrics, greeting cards, witticisms, and more.
  5. Say it Another Way - Fill in the blank with a synonym for the missing word. Interactive
  6. Specialized On-Line Dictionaries in one of 60 areas, from Advertising to Travel.
  7. Synonym.com - type a word in the box and find a synonym, or antonym, of the word.
  8. Synonym & Antonym Word Encounters - Level 1 words | Level 2 words | Level 3 words Interactive
  9. Synonymical: The Synonym Game - [this link opens on a new page] click to select the letters (one at a time) that spell the proper synonym. (Author - David Fisco) Interactive
  10. The Thesaurus - a reference book that lists words and their synonyms - Drag and drop the words to the right thesaurus entry. Interactive
  11. Word Central from Merriam Webster - a customizable dictionary and a daily buzz word
  12. WWWebster's Online Dictionary look up a word or a phrase
  13. YourDictionary.com - This site says that it is the web's most authoritative and comprehensive language portal
(D)  determine meanings of derivatives by applying knowledge of the meanings of root words such as like, pay, or happy and affixes such as dis-, pre-, or un-
  1. Rootonym - Level 1 | Level 2 | Level 3 - studying the roots/cells: cess/ced, cept/cip and cur.
  2. Rooty's Weekly Root - Three Rootonym® puzzles per week with 4 words per puzzle
  3. Vocabulary University - acquire and retain vocabulary
(E)  study word meanings systematically such as across curricular content areas and through current events
 
(F)  distinguish denotative and connotative meanings
 
(G)  use word origins as an aid to understanding historical influences on English word meanings
 

(10) Comprehension - The student uses a variety of strategies to comprehend a wide range of texts of increasing levels of difficulty.

(A)  use his/her own knowledge and experience to comprehend

 
(B)  establish and adjust purposes for reading such as reading to find out, to understand, to interpret, to enjoy, and to solve problems
  1. Looking for the Fine Print - students read advertisements to practice reading critically Interactive
(C)  monitor his/her own comprehension and make modifications when understanding breaks down such as by rereading a portion aloud, using reference aids, searching for clues, and asking questions
  1. Asking Questions - the types of questions depend on the answer to that first important question: Why am I reading this? Once you establish a purpose for yourself, you can then ask which questions will help you achieve that goal. This page asks students to rank a set of questions on a scale of one to five.
  2. Questioning Toolkit - seventeen types of questions from the educational journal, FNO
(D)  describe mental images that text descriptions evoke
 
(E)  use the text's structure or progression of ideas such as cause and effect or chronology to locate and recall information
  1. Making The Relationship Explicit Between Your Ideas - from UniLearning - Academic Writing
  2. Cause-and-Effect Writing Challenges Students - The cause-and-effect relationship is both a way of thinking and a format for writing. Teachers who emphasize cause-and-effect writing say that they are helping students learn to think critically as well as write cogently. Read what three experienced teachers have to say about this teaching approach, which can be used with students of all ages. This is an article from Education World magazine.
(F)  determine a text's main (or major) ideas and how those ideas are supported with details
  1. Finding the Main Idea Interactive
  2. Locating the Main Ideas of Paragraphs with Main-Idea Maps
  3. Main Idea - The main idea of a passage or reading is the central thought or message.
  4. Main Idea - Building Blocks of Comprehension
  5. Main Idea - The main idea of a paragraph is what all the sentences are about. Read the paragraph and ask, “What’s your point?”
  6. Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure - Challenge your students by letting them practice using a reading comprehension test designed for prospective teachers. (This site recommends that you use a printed copy of the page)
  7. Reading Comprehension - free reading comprehension worksheets for teachers and parents - includes original stories, poems, essays, and articles
  8. Summarize as You Read - When you summarize, eliminate unnecessary details. Focus on the main idea of the whole passage.
  9. What's the Big Idea? Exercise 1 - Write the common subject for each group of words, or "write a good title for each list." - a worksheet to print, not interactive
  10. What's the Big Idea? Exercise 2 - Write the common subject for each group of words, or "write a good title for each list." - a worksheet to print, not interactive
  11. What's the Big Idea? Exercise 3 - a bit harder than 1 & 2 - Write the common subject for each group of words, or "write a good title for each list." Then add another example that could be included in that group. Be as specific as you can. - a worksheet to print, not interactive
(G)  paraphrase and summarize text to recall, inform, or organize ideas
  1. Summarize as You Read - When you summarize, eliminate unnecessary details. Focus on the main idea of the whole passage.
(H)  draw inferences such as conclusions or generalizations and support them with text evidence and experience
  1. Drawing Conclusions - Read the story and choose the correct word to complete the sentence. Interactive
  2. Drawing Inferences in Text: Some Key Ideas
  3. Drawing Inferences - how to be a critical reader Interactive
  4. How are They Selling It? - students read three advertisements and evaluate the type of persuasive writing being employed Interactive
  5. Looking for the Fine Print - students read advertisements to practice reading critically Interactive
  6. Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions - descriptions of the various ways to aid you in reaching a conclusion
  7. Teaching Students to Make Inferences
(I)  find similarities and differences across texts such as in treatment, scope, or organization
 
(J)  distinguish fact and opinion in various texts
  1. Distinguishing Between Fact and Opinion Interactive
  2. Fact or Opinion Quiz - Decide which of these statements are fact or opinion from the drop-down list, then click on the "Finished" button to obtain your score out of ten.
  3. Fact or Opinion? (quiz 1) - a Quia quiz
  4. Fact or Opinion? (quiz 2) - a Quia quiz
  5. Fact, Habit, Opinion or Schedule? - an English-Zone quiz
  6. Fact or Opinion? - When a sentence is a fact, click the circle next to fact.
  7. Distinguishing Between Fact and Opinion Interactive
  8. Fact and Opinion Self-Test
  9. Martin Luther King Jr.: Fact or Opinion? (a worksheet to print)
  10. A mix of factual information and the opinions of the author. Often the opinions are disguised as fact, to make the author's argument seem more believable.
(K)  answer different types and levels of questions such as open-ended, literal, and interpretative as well as test-like questions such as multiple choice, true-false, and short answer
  1. Brainchild Test - (This quiz opens in a new page. Close the page when finished to return to this list.) 12 questions - Students should use the summary page after finishing this test to practice their areas of weakness.
  2. CRCT Language Arts and Reading Keywords - Grades 4 - 8 - multiple choice vocabulary quiz
  3. The FCAT Sample Test Books are designed to help students become familiar with FCAT (Florida) by providing helpful hints and offering practice answering questions in different formats. Half of this document is math and half is reading. This is an Adobe Acrobat document
  4. News Stories with Comprehension Quizzes [from the BBC] - (1) White loafers and passport control, (2) Hungry ferrett causes rail scare, (3) Dyslexic boy's site wins top award, (4) Otters head for towns and cities, (5) Demolition fears after city blaze.
    1. News Quiz Archive - over 50 news stories from the BBC - Choose carefully, not all of these would be appropriate for 7th grade students. Also, take a look at a section of stories which include math in the news and the quiz
  5. Online Practice Reading Tests- Grades 1-8 -Questions are designed to have students process the information in the passage, analyze it, and organize it for the answer. In this way, these practice questions test students’ analytical abilities, not just comprehension. Bubbling format very similar to Standardized testing format.
  6. Reading Comprehension stories - Interactive quizzes online for 5 stories - Each text is followed by a grammar exercise and summary writing exercise.
  7. Read a Contract - and answer questions
  8. Reading Comprehension Quiz- Online quiz
  9. Reading Comprehension stories - Interactive quizzes online for 5 stories - Each text is followed by a grammar exercise and summary writing exercise.
  10. Reading Exercises - Comprehension, Fill in and Sequencing
  11. Released TAKS Tests
  12. Seventh Grade Reading (2003) - Read the introduction and the passage that follows. Then read each question and mark the circle next to the correct answer. Interactive
  13. Seventh Grade Writing (2003) - Read the introduction and the passage that follows. Then read each question and mark the circle next to the correct answer.
  14. Texas end-of-year reading test from 2003
(L)  represent text information in different ways such as in outline, timeline, or graphic organizer
  1. Charts and Graphs
    1. Interpreting a Data Chart - students practice by answering questions about what can be found in a grid chart Interactive
    2. Interpreting Column Graphs - students practice by answering ten questions about the graph Interactive
    3. Interpreting Circle (Pie) Graphs - students practice by answering eight questions about the graph
  2. Concept Maps Explained - Concept maps and story webs are visual ways to structure ideas. (sample included
  3. Five main types of organizers - links showing examples of many types
(M)  use study strategies to learn and recall important ideas from texts such as preview, question, reread, and record
 

(11) Literary Response - The student expresses and supports responses to various types of texts.

(A)  offer observations, make connections, react, speculate, interpret, and raise questions in response to texts

  1. Guess What Comes Next - students read a passage and predict what would happen next Interactive
  2. Warren S. Fish Has a Secret - read the story and try to predict what happens next
  3. The World's Greatest Contralto by Babette Albin - As you read the story, write your questions and ideas about it on another sheet of paper. Then complete the next page.
  4. Write your own Branching Story for others to speculate about (using MS Excel) - download a sample
(B)  interpret text ideas through such varied means journal writing, discussion, enactment, and media
 
(C)  support responses by referring to relevant aspects of text and his/her own experiences
 
(D)  connect, compare, and contrast ideas, themes, and issues across text
  1. Aesop's Fables - Two versions of each story to compare and contrast.
  2. Compare and Contrast on Venn Diagram - Click on number 42. Video Interactive lesson and practice.
  3. Compare/Contrast - An online tutorial plus activity pages to complete to practice the skill.
  4. Compare and Contrast - three -page tutorial showing examples using a T Chart or a Venn Diagram
  5. Compare and Contrast - practice quizzes
  6. Resources to use for Compare and Contrast from Scholastic

(12) Text Structures/Literary Concepts - The student analyzes the characteristics of various types of texts (genres).

(A)  identify the purposes of different types of texts such as to inform, influence, express, or entertain

  1. Affluenza: A PBS Program - Lessons such as "Be an Adbuster!" and "What are Advertisers Selling?" are based on Affluenza, a one-hour television special that explores the high social and environmental costs of materialism and over consumption. The lessons can be used without the video.
  2. Analyzing Political Ads - Students will view current political ads and learn how they make use of various commercial ad appeals. Students will also develop familiarity with basic videography terms.
  3. Different Types of Text - Do you understand the purpose of different text types and the main differences between them? Online quizzes
  4. Finding the purpose of each paragraph - from a site on preparing for the GRE
  5. Guide to Analysis of Political Ads
  6. Reading for a Purpose - Nine activities to check understanding about the purposes of different sorts of text Interactive
  7. Sample assignment - Invent an X-ray satellite, name it, draw a picture of it. Write a one- to two-page persuasion letter addressed to your Congressperson or essay for your local newspaper in order to obtain funding for your X-ray astronomy mission.
  8. Text Types- Online game helping learn about the different text types such as persuasion, informative, descriptive, or instructive. Interactive
  9. The writer's purpose and voice - from a site on preparing for the GRE
  10. Writing to Persuade - Persuasion means making someone with a different point of view from your own change their mind to your way of thinking.
  11. Writing to Persuade Rubric - Perhaps your students can understand writing to persuade better by seeing this rubric.
(B)  recognize the distinguishing features of genres, including biography, historical fiction, informational texts, and poetry
 
(C)  compare communication in different forms such as contrasting a dramatic performance with a print version of the same story or comparing story variants
 
(D)  understand and identify literary terms such as playwright, theater, stage, act, dialogue, analogy, and scene across a variety of literary forms (texts)
  1. Fact Monster Analogy of the Day Interactive
  2. Analogy Quiz which requires students to type the word to complete the analogy
  3. Analogy Lesson from Diana Dell
  4. Analogy quiz 1 at Quia posted by Diana Dell
  5. Analogy quiz 2 at Quia posted by Diana Dell
  6. Analogy Quiz from Paul Shoebottom at Frankfurt International School
  7. Awesome Analogies for one or two players - posted at Quia
  8. Discovery School Analogy Quizzes
    1. AnalogyQuiz8
    2. AnalogyQuiz9
    3. AnalogyQuiz10
  9. Puzz.com has a quiz with 152 analogies - pick one or two a day and practice this valuable skill
  10. This is a PowerPoint showAnalogy PowerPoint Show template - you make modifications to use with your students
(E)  understand literary forms by recognizing and distinguishing among such types of text as stories, poems, myths, fables, tall tales, limericks, plays, biographies, and autobiographies
 
(F)  analyze characters, including their traits, motivations, conflicts, points of view, relationships, and changes they undergo
 
(G)  recognize and analyze story plot, setting, and problem resolution
  1. Short Story Elements - online quiz
(H)  describe how the author's perspective or point of view affects the text
  1. Point of View - All writing involves Point of View. This aspect means the writer has chosen, based on his/her analysis of the reader(s) and writing situation, a speaker for the ideas presented in the letter, memo, or report. Point of View concerns who is explaining or arguing, and its most important rule involves consistency.
  2. Definition of Point of View - All literature must be narrated or recorded by someone, and an author must decide who that someone will be.
  3. Point of View - Two Heads Aren't Always Better Than One. suggestions regarding choosing a point of view for your writing
  4. Point of View Quiz - Read each group of sentences. Decide if it is written in first person or third person point of view.
(I)  analyze ways authors organize and present ideas such as through cause/effect, compare/contrast, inductively, deductively, or chronologically
  1. Cause and Effect - (This link opens in a new page. Close the page to return to this list) Excellent site for middle/high school. Seeing Reason is a classroom workspace for investigating cause and effect relationships in complex systems. At the heart of Seeing Reason is an interactive mapping tool that helps students map relationships and construct models of their understanding.
  2. Cause and Effect Story - online story with questions. not interactive
  3. Cause and Effect Books - Book list on stories to use for cause and effect lessons.
  4. Cause and Effect Slide Show Presentation - online audio lesson Grade 6-8. Use this Quiz as a follow-up.
  5. Cause and Effect Quizzes - Quiz One; Quiz Two.
  6. Cause and Effect Paragraphs - Online lesson and quizzes at the end.
  7. Online cause and effect sentence quiz.
  8. Cause and Effect quiz - Match cause with effect
  9. Cause and Effect quizzes - Quiz One; Quiz Two, Quiz Three ; Quiz Four ; Quiz Five .
  10. Cause and Effect Graphic Organizers - print these out to practice this skill.
  11. Resources to use for Cause and Effect from Scholastic
(J)  recognize and interpret literary devices such as flashback, foreshadowing, and symbolism
 
(K)  recognize how style, tone, and mood contribute to the effect of the text
 

(13) Inquiry/Research - The student inquires and conducts research using a variety of sources.

(A)  form and revise questions for investigations, including questions arising from readings, assignments, and units of study

 
(B)  use text organizers, including headings, graphic features, and tables of contents, to locate and organize information
 
(C)  use multiple sources, including electronic texts, experts, and print resources, to locate information relevant to research questions
 
(D)  interpret and use graphic sources of information such as maps, graphs, timelines or tables to address research questions
  1. Charts and Graphs
    1. Interpreting a Data Chart - students practice by answering questions about what can be found in a grid chart Interactive
    2. Interpreting Column Graphs - students practice by answering ten questions about the graph Interactive
    3. Interpreting Circle (Pie) Graphs - students practice by answering eight questions about the graph
  2. Looking for the Fine Print - students read advertisements to practice reading critically
  3. What’s On a Map? - eight questions about using various parts of a map
(E)  summarize and organize information from multiple sources by taking notes, outlining ideas, and making charts
  1. Take Notes - students evaluate what items should be included in the opening paragraph of a news story Interactive
(F)  produce research projects and reports in effective formats for various audiences
 
(G)  draw conclusions from information gathered from multiple sources
  1. Drawing Conclusions - Read the story and choose the correct word to complete the sentence.
  2. Drawing Inferences in Text: Some Key Ideas
  3. Drawing Inferences - how to be a critical reader
  4. How are They Selling It? - students read three advertisements and evaluate the type of persuasive writing being employed
  5. Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions - descriptions of the various ways to aid you in reaching a conclusion
  6. Teaching Students to Make Inferences
  7. What are They Selling - students critically evaluate six advertisements
(H)  use compiled information and knowledge to raise additional, unanswered questions
 
(I)  present organized statements, reports, and speeches using visuals or media to support meaning
 

(14) Culture - The student reads to increase knowledge of his/her own culture, the culture of others, and the common elements of cultures.

(A)  compare text events with his/her own and other readers' experiences

 
(B)  determine distinctive and common characteristics of cultures through wide reading
 
(C)  articulate and discuss themes and connections that cross cultures
  1. Proverbs Around the World- Analyze information and assess meaning from prior knowledge - Print this sheet and have group discussions on meanings. This is an Adobe Acrobat document

Writing

(15) Purposes - The student writes for a variety of audiences and purposes and in a variety of forms.

(A)  write to express, discover, record, develop, reflect on ideas, and to problem solve

  1. A Handbook of Rhetorical Devices - definitions and examples of more than sixty traditional rhetorical devices, all of which can still be useful today to improve the effectiveness, clarity, and enjoyment of your writing
  2. Creating an Argument - This exercise will guide you through the prewriting, organizing and writing stages of producing a philosophy.
  3. Critical Reasoning Warm-ups - (Scroll down, it's there!) These are warm-ups for people who are somewhat familiar with critical reasoning questions. These questions are a good way to start your brain thinking before you answer the real questions.
  4. Which Writing? (6-8) [this link opens on a new page] Students choose an appropriate format for writing. (Author - Carol Rine) Interactive
(B)  write to influence such as to persuade, argue, and request
  1. Battle Bars: The Edible Argument - a lesson plan designed to teach persuasive writing using Snickers and Kit-Kat bars
  2. Finding the purpose of each paragraph - from a site on preparing for the GRE
  3. Have Web, Will Travel - In this lesson, students demonstrate their Web research and persuasive writing skills to create colorful, informative Web travel guides to popular vacation destinations.
  4. How are They Selling It? - students read three advertisements and evaluate the type of persuasive writing being employed Interactive
  5. Persuasive Writing Prompts used in past Writing Assessments in Tennessee
  6. The Power of Persuasion - a WebQuest that challenges your students to investigate persuasive writing and develop critical reading skills
  7. Reading for a Purpose - Nine activities to check understanding about the purposes of different sorts of text Interactive
  8. Sample assignment - Invent an X-ray satellite, name it, draw a picture of it. Write a one- to two-page persuasion letter addressed to your Congressperson or essay for your local newspaper in order to obtain funding for your X-ray astronomy mission.
  9. Scholastic's Writing Workshop - You already spend a lot of time trying to persuade your parents or teachers to allow you to watch more TV or do less homework. Now you can use those same skills to write a persuasive essay!
  10. Study Guides and Strategies - persuasive writing
  11. TV or Not TV? - a WebQuest about persuasive writing
  12. The writer's purpose and voice - from a site on preparing for the GRE
  13. Writing to Persuade - Persuasion means making someone with a different point of view from your own change their mind to your way of thinking.
  14. Writing to Persuade Rubric - Perhaps your students can understand writing to persuade better by seeing this rubric.
(C)  write to inform such as to explain, describe, report, and narrate
  1. Expository Text - Use the Types of Expository Text box as project idea starters. There is also a discussion of the seven basic structures of expository text.
  2. Expository Writing - Eight different examples of expository organizational patterns
  3. Expository Writing Prompts - 11 writing prompts
  4. A Lesson in Expository Writing -The Personal Touch: - This lesson uses examples of such communication as a springboard for practice in expository writing.
  5. Expository Writing Prompts - Eighth Grade - from the State of TN web site.
  6. The Expository Essay - Examples of expository essays
  7. Expository Essays - Some things to consider when writing expository essays.
  8. Expository Writing Tips! - The information was taken from "Blowing Away the State Writing Assessment Test" by Jane Bell Kiester available through Maupin House Publishing.
  9. Expository Writing Plan - Use this information to help create your essays.
  10. Expository Writing Rubric -
  11. Expository Writing Rubric - very detailed
  12. Expository Writing Genre Study - Fifteen focused lessons
  13. Food for Thought - an expository writing lesson plan for eighth grade
  14. Information Elimination (6 - 8) [this link opens on a new page] Students model, instruct, and practice narrowing a topic for expository writing. (Author - Julie Thompson) Interactive
  15. Resources to use for Expository Writing from Scholastic
  16. Writing a Process Essay - What to consider when writing a process essay.
(D)  write to entertain such as to compose humorous poems or short stories
  1. Principles of Writing Narrative Essays - article describing principles
  2. Multiple Paragraph Essay - pointers on writing an essay
  3. Narrative Essay - article on how to write a narrative essay
  4. Narrative Essay - article and help on writing narrative essay
  5. Step by step guide - guide on writing an essay
  6. Narrative essay prompts - ten prompts
  7. Shifting Gears - Lesson - students will write a personal narrative that is designed to help them reflect on the nature and meaning of change in their lives
  8. Ten Narrative Writing Prompts - targeted mainly at high school teachers, but the questions can be modified
  9. Ten Prewriting Exercises for Personal Narratives
  10. Narrative Writing Prompts - elementary school
  11. Narrative Genre Study - This narrative study is designed to immerse students in narrative writing. (12 lessons)
  12. Narrative Writing Rubric - detailed rubric
  13. Resources to use for Narrative Writing from Scholastic -
  14. Student Writing Tools Handbook - transitions, rubrics, grammar, citations, and more This is an Adobe Acrobat document
  15. Template for writing a narrative - scaffolding guide for students This is an Adobe Acrobat document
(E)  select and use voice and style appropriate to audience and purpose
  1. Nursery Rhyme Expansion - Nursery Rhymes can be wonderful springboards for all kinds of Language Arts activities. Here is an activity designed to give middle school students practice with the aspects of purpose, voice, and audience in their writing.
(F)  choose the appropriate form for his/her own purpose for writing such as journals, letters, editorials, reviews, poems, memoirs, narratives, and instructions
  1. Which Writing? (6-8) [this link opens on a new page] Students choose an appropriate format for writing. (Author - Carol Rine) Interactive
(G)  use literary devices effectively such as suspense, dialogue, and figurative language
  1. 12 Exercises for Improving Dialogue from the Writer's Resource Center
  2. Figurative Language
    1. A one-page handout giving examples of each poetic device This is an Adobe Acrobat document
    2. A concept map to use when you work with your students on these topics This is an Adobe Acrobat document
    3. A Fun Way to Teach Similes - a lesson idea from Bruce Lansky
    4. Alliteration or Simile? - Choose whether each statement is an alliterative phrase, simile or neither.
    5. Bud, Not Buddy - [these links open on new pages] quizzes on similes & metaphors Matching | Flashcards | Concentration Interactive
    6. Chasing Metaphors - students explore the figurative language of metaphors by turning a series of objects, concepts, events, or characters into metaphors, first in written form and then by creating a video with images, text, and sound [Quick Time required]
    7. Do you know your metaphors? - drag words to make a metaphor Interactive
    8. Do you know your similes? - drag the nouns to complete a Simile (Refresh the page to get a new set.)
    9. Figurative Language - terms, definitions, and an example
    10. Figurative Language Quiz - [this link opens on a new page] alliteration, similes and metaphors, personification, connotation and imagery
    11. Literature-Figurative Language-Part 1 - Read these lines from poems. Identify the meaning you think fits best. Interactive
    12. Literary Devices Quizzes - [these links open on new pages] similes, metaphors, personification, slang/dialect and allusions - Matching | Concentration | Flashcards Interactive
    13. Literary Terms quiz - Choose whether the line from a poem is an example of alliteration, metaphor, onomatopoeia, personification, or simile.
    14. Metaphor Lists - a selection of metaphors by category, complete with sample usage and interpretation
    15. Metaphor Battleship Quiz - [this link opens on a new page] Quia quiz using the Battleship game format Interactive
    16. Metaphor Quiz - [this link opens on a new page] a five-question quiz at Quia
    17. Mataphor Quiz - [this link opens on a new page] a ten-question quiz at Quia
    18. Metaphor Quiz to print
    19. Poetic Devices - a classroom sign about the forms of poetic devices This is an Adobe Acrobat document
    20. Poetry writing practice web This is an Adobe Acrobat document .
    21. Practicing onomatopoeia, alliteration, rhyme, simile and metaphor Interactive
      1. Word Play 1 | Word Play 2 | Word Play 3 | Word Play 4 | Word Play 5 | Word Play 6
    22. Simile lesson with a printable quiz
    23. Simile Quiz to print
    24. Similes and Metaphors - Identify the comparison in each sentence as a simile or a metaphor [ignore the email address blank].
  3. Narrative and Dialogue - A Contrast In Writing Styles
  4. Quotation Marks
    1. The Gallery Of "Misused" Quotation Marks
    2. Quotation Marks - Exercise to be printed and completed by students at their desk | answer to the exercise
    3. Quotation Marks - Place commas and periods inside, not outside, quotation marks. Place all other punctuation outside quotation marks unless it was contained in the original source.
    4. Quotation Marks - In the United States, periods and commas go inside quotation marks regardless of logic.
    5. Quotation Marks and Colons - online quiz
    6. Single Quotation Marks - Use single quotation marks for a quotation or title using quotation marks inside another quotation or title which uses quotation marks.
  5. Writing Dialogue - "Personally, I think dialogue can make or break a story. Here are some tips I’ve discovered that may help you with yours," said Elizabeth Rose.
  6. Writing Dialogue - This is a dialogue sheet which can be used to teach students to include the basic characteristics of good dialogue in their own writing. The form may be modified to include whatever characteristics the instructor desires.
(H)  produce cohesive and coherent written texts by organizing ideas, using effective transitions, and choosing precise wording
  1. Information Elimination (6 - 8) [this link opens on a new page] Students model, instruct, and practice narrowing a topic for expository writing. (Author - Julie Thompson) Interactive
  2. Transitions indicate relations, whether from sentence to sentence, or from paragraph to paragraph. This is a list of "relationships" that supporting ideas may have, followed by a list of "transitional" words and phrases  that can connect those ideas:
  3. Using Transitions - Transitional words and phrases can create powerful links between ideas in your paper and can help your reader understand the logic of your paper
  4. Transitional Devices (Connecting Words) - Brought to you by the Purdue University Online Writing Lab
  5. Transition Words and Phrases - Transition words and phrases help establish clear connections between ideas.
  6. Writing Research Papers: Transition Words and Phrases
  7. Writing Academic Essays - transition words
  8. A chart of the transitional devices - also called conjunctive adverbs or adverbial conjunctions
  9. Trailblazing Conclusions (6 - 8) [this link opens on a new page] Students develop a sense of ending by using closure and thought-provoking statements. (Author - Laurie Ayers) Interactive
  10. Transitional Devices (Connecting Words) - Brought to you by the Purdue University Online Writing Lab
  11. Transitional Devices - transitional guides are connectives (symbols,words, phrases; sometimes whole sentences and paragraphs) that make possible a smooth "passing over" from one idea to the next.

(16) Penmanship/Capitalization/Punctuation/Spelling - The student composes original texts, applying the conventions of written language such as capitalization, punctuation, handwriting, penmanship and spelling to communicate clearly.

(A)  write legibly by selecting cursive or manuscript as appropriate

 
(B)  capitalize and punctuate correctly to clarify and enhance meaning such as capitalizing titles, using hyphens, semicolons, colons, possessives, and sentence punctuation
  1. A Brief, No-Nonsense Guide to Comma Usage (plus a great cartoon)
  2. The Colon - an explanation from The Guide to Grammar and Writing
  3. Commas vs. Semicolons in Compound Sentences - Brought to you by the Purdue University Online Writing Lab
  4. Grammar and Style: Semicolons - from the Writer's Handbook
  5. Power Proofreading - Choose 7th grade then select; Letter to Ms. Flack, , or any one of the mixed practice exercises. Interactive
  6. Proofreading for Commas - Brought to you by the Purdue University Online Writing Lab
  7. Review: The Comma - Using a separate sheet of paper, rewrite each sentence to correct the comma usage. (answers provided)
  8. Semicolons in Compound Sentences - Use a semicolon to separate independent clauses in a compound sentence.
  9. Semicolon and Colon Quiz - answers are available, this quiz is not interactive
  10. Using Colons Effectively - Click on "The sentence, please!" and a sentence to edit will appear in the top text-area.
  11. Using Commas - Brought to you by the Purdue University Online Writing Lab
(C)  spell derivatives correctly by applying the spellings of bases and affixes
 
(D)  spell frequently misspelled words correctly such as their, they're, and there
  1. Confusing Verbs - Lay / Lie - Read the sentence, and then choose the answer, and get your score instantly! Interactive
  2. Confusing Verbs: Raise / Rise
  3. Its/It's and There/Their/They're - Select one answer from the choices provided after each sentence. The word you choose should fit the blank in the sentence. Interactive
  4. Lie/Lay - Sit/Set - Select one answer from the choices provided after each sentence. The word you choose should fit the blank in the sentence Interactive
  5. The Notorious Confusables - Quiz 1 | Quiz 2 | Quiz 3 | Quiz 4 | Quiz 5
  6. Online Spelling Quizzes - numerous quizzes in TCAP format
  7. Past Tenses of Sit/Set and Lay/Lie - What is the correct verb form in each sentence?
  8. Problem verbs review - sit/set/lie/lay/rise/raise - Practice with these games to get a clear meaning of each of these troublesome verbs. Interactive
  9. Raise or Rise? - Make a choice by clicking on the radio button, then compare it with the correct answer hidden under the answer button.
  10. Rise/Raise Practice Quiz - from Quia
  11. Sit or Set Quiz - Complete the sentences using the proper form of "sit" or "set."
  12. Special Quiz on Except/Accept and Affect/Effect - Select one answer from the choices provided after each sentence. The word you choose should fit the blank in the sentence.
  13. To / Two / Too - Learn the difference between the homophones to, two, and too. Interactive
  14. To/too/two quiz - an ESL quiz by James Rainville
(E)  use resources to find correct spellings
  1. Ask Dr. Dictionary - Look up a word, or look at the Doctor's links to other dictionary sites on the web.
  2. FreeDictionary - Has word of the day, quote of the day, article of the day, word game of the day and more.
  3. Roget's Thesaurus Search Form
  4. Rhyming Dictionary - You can use it to help write poetry, song lyrics, greeting cards, witticisms, and more.
  5. Specialized On-Line Dictionaries in one of 60 areas, from Advertising to Travel.
  6. Word Central from Merriam Webster - a customizable dictionary and a daily buzz word
  7. WWWebster's Online Dictionary look up a word or a phrase
  8. YourDictionary.com - This site says that it is the web's most authoritative and comprehensive language portal
(F)  spell accurately in final drafts
 
(G)  understand the influence of other languages and cultures on the spelling of English words
  1. Foreign Words and Phrases - The English meanings given are not necessarily literal translations.
  2. Travlang's Translating Dictionaries featuring 18 languages.

(17) Grammar/Usage - The student applies standard grammar and usage to communicate clearly and effectively in writing.

(A)  write in complete sentences, varying the types such as compound and complex sentences, and use appropriately punctuated independent and dependent clauses

 
(B)  use conjunctions to connect ideas meaningfully
  1. Avoiding Comma Splices, Fused Sentences, and Run-On's from LEO: Literacy Education Online
  2. Avoiding Comma Splices - Click on "The sentence, please!" and a sentence containing a comma splice will appear in the top text-area. Repair the sentence.
  3. Avoiding Comma Splices II - Click on "The sentence, please!" and a sentence containing a comma splice will appear in the top text-area. Repair the sentence.
  4. Combining Sentences for Variety and Clarity - several methods and examples are given, however this page only combines two sentences.
  5. Conjunctions - Click on the buttons to find the correct answer Interactive
  6. Conjunctions Quiz I - Click the answer buttons to see the answers.
  7. Conjunctions Quiz II - Combine the sentences using the conjunction given in parentheses.
  8. Conjunction-itis Popup - Find the correct conjunction form to combine two short sentences together into one! (a Quia quiz)
  9. Conjunctions - Conjunctions are words used as joiners. Different kinds of conjunctions join different kinds of grammatical structures.
  10. Fragments and Run-On's - After each sentence, select the option which best describes that sentence.
  11. The Need to Combine Sentences - Sentences have to be combined to avoid the monotony that would surely result if all sentences were brief and of equal length. This lesson is followed by three quizzes.
  12. Power Proofreading - Choose 7th grade then select; Climb Every Mountain, , or any one of the mixed practice exercises. Interactive
  13. Repairing Run-On Sentences
  14. sample of a good 239-word sentence - It's not the kind of thing you'd want to read very often, but it does work. Remember, this is not a run-on sentence.
  15. Writing Effective Sentences: Eliminating Sentence Errors Comma Splices and Fused Sentences - not interactive.
(C)  employ standard English usage in writing for audiences, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun referents, and parts of speech
  1. Controlling Shifts in Verb Tense - General guideline: Do not shift from one tense to another if the time frame for each action or state is the same.
  2. ESL Subject Verb Agreement Quiz 1 - In the quiz questions , choose the correct verb so that subject and verb agree.
  3. ESL Subject Verb Agreement Quiz 2 - Do this quiz after mastering the quiz questions and their rules in the first
  4. Let's see whether you understand subject-verb agreement. - Read each sentence, enter your response in the space provided, and then press "Submit" to check your answer.
  5. Making Subjects and Verbs Agree: Exercises - a worksheet to print, not interactive
  6. Power Proofreading - Choose 8th grade then select; E-mail to HME-TV Staff, Sour Sid on Sports, You Solve it, Weather or Not, Animal Alarm, or any one of the mixed practice exercises. Interactive
  7. Parts of Speech - Noun, Verb, Preposition, etc. Interactive quizzes
  8. Quiz on Subject Verb Agreement - Select one answer from the choices provided after each sentence. The word you choose should fit the blank in the sentence. Don't use the HINT buttons unless you really need them.
  9. A Second Quiz on Subject-Verb Agreement - After each sentence select the verb form that will best fit in the blank. The explanation will describe the process of arriving at the correct choice for that sentence.
  10. Third Quiz on Subject-Verb Agreement - Select the appropriate verbs from the drop-down menus to complete each sentence correctly. There are thirty-three "opportunities for error" in these paragraphs.
  11. Subject-Verb Agreement Quiz - Select the correct verb form to agree with the subject.
  12. This is a PowerPoint showSubject-Verb Agreement: The Sore Thumb of Grammar
  13. Subject/Verb Agreement - Click the answer button to see the answer.
  14. Subject/verb agreement - Basic Principle: Singular subjects need singular verbs; plural subjects need plural verbs. Other SV agreement quizzes Quiz 2 | Quiz 3
  15. Subject and Verb Agreement from LEO: Literacy Education Online
  16. Subject Verb Agreement Quiz
  17. Subject-Verb Agreement Quiz from the ESL Quiz Center
  18. There is  or  there are? Interactive
  19. Tag Questions 1 - Present Tense/To Be Verb/Affirmative Interactive
  20. The CopyCat Game 1 from English-Zone Interactive
  21. Making Subjects and Verbs Agree - Brought to you by the Purdue University Online Writing Lab
  22. Subject-Verb Agreement - from The Writer's Handbook
  23. Subject Verb Agreement from Big Dog's Grammar
  24. The grammar outlaw: Disagreeing Subject and Verb, AKA The Disagreeable Sentence
  25. Practicing past, present & future tenses - Tense Activity 1 | Tense Activity 2 | Tense Activity 3 Interactive
  26. Practicing adverbs, adjectives, nouns, pronouns, verbs - Word Skills 1 | Word Skills 2 | Word Skills 3 Interactive
(D)  use adjectives (comparatives and superlatives forms) and adverbs appropriately to make writing vivid or precise
  1. Adjective or Adverb Exercise 1 Interactive
  2. Adjective or Adverb Exercise 2 Interactive
  3. Power Proofreading (adjective practice) - Choose 7th grade then select; Know it All, Review for Endless Entertainment Show, or any one of the mixed practice exercises. Interactive
  4. Power Proofreading(adverb practice) - Choose 7th grade then select; Sports Minute, or any one of the mixed practice exercises. Interactive
  5. Comparative & Superlative Quiz - Click the answer buttons to see the answers.
  6. Practicing adverbs, adjectives, nouns, pronouns, verbs - Word Skills 1 | Word Skills 2 | Word Skills 3 Interactive
(E)  use prepositional phrases to elaborate written ideas
  1. Power Proofreading - Choose 7th grade then select; The Shopping Show or The Runaway Classroom , or any one of the mixed practice exercises. Interactive
  2. Prepositions at the Crossword I - Type the correct letter in each box. Use the tab key to move from box to box or use your mouse-button to place the letter in each box. Interactive
  3. Prepositions at the Crossword II - Type the correct letter in each box. Use the tab key to move from box to box or use your mouse-button to place the letter in each box. Interactive
  4. Prepositions at the Crossword III - Type the correct letter in each box. Use the tab key to move from box to box or use your mouse-button to place the letter in each box. Interactive
  5. Quiz on Prepositions - For each question, choose the single best answer.
  6. Recognizing the Function of Phrases - When you click on "Start this test," you will be presented with a sentence.
  7. Recognizing Prepositions - The following paragraph is taken from Ernest Hemingway's short story "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber." Click on the prepositions in the order in which they appear and they will appear in the text-area below the paragraph.
  8. Verb and Preposition Combinations I - a quiz from the English-Zone
  9. Verb and Preposition Combinations II - a quiz from the English-Zone
  10. Verb and Preposition Combinations III - a quiz from the English-Zone
(F)  use verb tenses appropriately and consistently such as present, past, future, perfect, and progressive
  1. Controlling Shifts in Verb Tense - General guideline: Do not shift from one tense to another if the time frame for each action or state is the same.
  2. Power Proofreading - Choose 8th grade then select; E-mail to HME-TV Staff, Sour Sid on Sports, You Solve it, Weather or Not, Animal Alarm, or any one of the mixed practice exercises. Interactive
  3. Parts of Speech - Noun, Verb, Preposition, etc. Interactive quizzes
  4. Subject/verb agreement - Basic Principle: Singular subjects need singular verbs; plural subjects need plural verbs. Other SV agreement quizzes Quiz 2 | Quiz 3
  5. Subject and Verb Agreement from LEO: Literacy Education Online
  6. Subject Verb Agreement Quiz
  7. Subject-Verb Agreement Quiz from the ESL Quiz Center
  8. There is  or  there are? Interactive
  9. Tag Questions 1 - Present Tense/To Be Verb/Affirmative Interactive
  10. The CopyCat Game 1 from English-Zone Interactive
  11. Making Subjects and Verbs Agree - Brought to you by the Purdue University Online Writing Lab
  12. Subject-Verb Agreement - from The Writer's Handbook
  13. Subject Verb Agreement from Big Dog's Grammar
  14. The grammar outlaw: Disagreeing Subject and Verb, AKA The Disagreeable Sentence
  15. Practicing past, present & future tenses - Tense Activity 1 | Tense Activity 2 | Tense Activity 3 Interactive
  16. Practicing adverbs, adjectives, nouns, pronouns, verbs - Word Skills 1 | Word Skills 2 | Word Skills 3 Interactive
(G)  write with increasing accuracy when using apostrophes in contractions such as won't and possessives such as Smith's
  1. Apostrophes with Possessive Nouns - a grammar quiz [ignore the part about email address]
  2. Catastrophes of Apostrophic Proportions - a quiz on apostrophes
  3. Exercises in Plurals and Possessives - place a C by correct items and an I by incorrect items
  4. Grammar Blast - Choose your grade level and practice grammar skills Interactive
  5. Interactive Grammar Quizzes - many topics covered
  6. Online Grammar Quizzes - many categories to select from
  7. Parts of Speech - Noun, Verb, Preposition, etc. Interactive quizzes Interactive
  8. Parts of Speech Quiz -Select correct part of speech
  9. Plural and Possessive Nouns - By clicking on a bubble, identify whether the highlighted word is a plural or possessive noun and then click on the "Submit Answer" button.
  10. Possessives and Irregular Plurals - 25 items in the quiz
  11. Possessive Noun Practice - a six question quiz
  12. Possessive Noun Quiz - a five question quiz [when asked to enter your name, enter X]
  13. Possessive Pronouns and Contractions - a ten question quiz [when asked to enter your name, enter X]
  14. Possessive Pronouns Used as Adjectives - a ten question quiz [when asked to enter your name, enter X]
  15. Power Proofreading - Choose 8th grade then select; Memo to Employees, Dimes for Rhymes, Views from our Viewers, or any one of the mixed practice exercises. Interactive
  16. Singular and Plural Possessive Nouns - Quiz quiz
  17. Using Apostrophes Correctly - from the University of Delaware writing center
(H)  write with increasing accuracy when using pronoun case such as "She had the party."
  1. Power Proofreading - Choose 8th grade then select; Word Workout, Eat Your Heart Out, Teen Time, or any one of the mixed practice exercises. Interactive
  2. Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement - LEO: Literacy Education Online
  3. Agreement: pronoun antecedent from Big Dog's Grammar. After reviewing this material take an interactive quiz.
  4. Power Proofreading - Choose 7th grade then select; Barnyard Ballet, Action Hero Role, Deadpan Acting Awards, or any one of the mixed practice exercises. Interactive
  5. Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement - This tutorial will help you accomplish the following learning objectives: define and understand pronoun agreement, choose pronouns that agree with their antecedents in number, person, and gender and check and apply your skills.
  6. Pronoun Case - The case of some pronouns depends on their function in sentences or clauses. This lesson is followed by an interactive quiz.
  7. Pronoun Case - Brought to you by the Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL)
  8. Practicing adverbs, adjectives, nouns, pronouns, verbs - Word Skills 1 | Word Skills 2 | Word Skills 3 Interactive

(18) Writing Processes - The student selects and uses writing processes for self-initiated and assigned writing.

(A)  generate ideas and plans for writing by using prewriting strategies such as brainstorming, graphic organizers, notes, and logs

  1. Bibliographic Blunders (6 - 8) [this link opens on a new page] Students use note cards to collect information. (Author - Carolyn Garner) Interactive
  2. Creating an Argument - This exercise will guide you through the prewriting, organizing and writing stages of producing a philosophy.
  3. Focused prewriting - steps to take while prewriting
  4. Prewriting - methods and tips
  5. Prewriting Practices - an article by Alice L. Trupe
  6. Prewriting Process - tools for students and teaching suggestions
  7. Prewriting Strategies - prewriting techniques
  8. Prewriting Strategies - ideas for prewriting
  9. Prewriting Strategies - from Gallaudet University
  10. Prewriting Tactics (6 - 8) [this link opens on a new page] Students organize and group related ideas. (Author - Laurie Ayers) Interactive
  11. Prewriting techniques - ideas which can be used to generate ideas for a variety of writing projects
  12. Prewriting Techniques from Friends University Writing Center This is an Adobe Acrobat document
  13. Prewriting Techniques from Mason, Kentucky This is an MS Word document
  14. Six Prewriting Steps
  15. Step-by-step Guide to Brainstorming - an effective way to generate lots of ideas and then determine which idea(s) best solves the problem
  16. Take Notes - students evaluate what items should be included in the opening paragraph of a news story Interactive
(B)  develop drafts by categorizing ideas, organizing them into paragraphs, and blending paragraphs within larger units of text
  1. Class Exercise: Paragraph Coherence - Practice creating paragraphs that treat one main topic in a common-sense order
  2. Cohesion: using repetition and reference words to emphasize key ideas in your writing
  3. Paragraph Coherence - a paragraph to read followed by questions to answer
  4. Paragraph Coherence Exercise - identify a potential topic sentence for the paragraph, identify what information presented in the paragraph is irrelevant, and then arrange what relevant information is left into a more coherent, well-structured paragraph
  5. Paragraph Development - Coherence
  6. Paragraph Coherence - Coherence in a paragraph is the technique of making words, phrases, and sentences move smoothly and logically from one to the other
  7. Paragraph structure - Study model paragraphs for English academic writing and apply the structures to your own paragraphs to meet your readers' expectations
  8. Paragraph Structure Exercise - number sentences in an appropriate order to form a well-structured paragraph
(C)  revise selected drafts by adding, elaborating, deleting, combining, and rearranging text
  1. Writing Effective Sentences: Eliminating Sentence Errors Comma Splices and Fused Sentences - not interactive.
  2. Conjunctions - Conjunctions are words used as joiners. Different kinds of conjunctions join different kinds of grammatical structures.
  3. Repairing Run-On Sentences
  4. Avoiding Comma Splices, Fused Sentences, and Run-On's from LEO: Literacy Education Online
  5. Combining Sentences for Variety and Clarity - several methods and examples are given, however this page only combines two sentences.
  6. The Need to Combine Sentences - Sentences have to be combined to avoid the monotony that would surely result if all sentences were brief and of equal length. This lesson is followed by three quizzes.
(D)  revise drafts for coherence, progression, and logical support of ideas
  1. Trailblazing Introductions (6 - 8) [this link opens on a new page] Students develop a sense of beginning by using strong leads. (Author - Laurie Ayers) Interactive
  2. Trailblazing Conclusions (6 - 8) [this link opens on a new page] Students develop a sense of ending by using closure and thought-provoking statements. (Author - Laurie Ayers) Interactive
(E)  edit drafts for specific purposes such as to ensure standard usage, varied sentence structure, and appropriate word choice
 
(F)  use available technology to support aspects of creating, revising, editing, and publishing texts
 
(G)  refine selected pieces frequently to "publish" for general and specific audiences
 
(H)  proofread his/her own writing and that of others
  1. Power Proofreading - Choose 7th grade then select any one of the practice exercises. Interactive
(I)  select and use reference materials and resources as needed for writing, revising, and editing final drafts
  1. The ABC's of Web Site Evaluation (presented by Kathy Schrock) - Evaluation of Web sites is an important skill to learn in this age of digital and information literacy. Students and teachers need practice in critically examining sites to determine authority, authenticity, and applicability to purpose. This site provides that practice.
  2. Critical Evaluation of Resources - In the research process you will encounter many types of resources including books, articles and web sites. But not everything you find on your topic will be suitable. How do you make sense of what is out there and evaluate its authority and appropriateness for your research?
  3. Critically Analyzing Information Sources - the emphasis here is on print sources
  4. Evaluation of information sources - This page contains pointers to criteria for evaluating information resources, particularly those on the Internet.
  5. Evaluating Information Found on the Internet - a thoughtful guide to evaluating web and other Internet resources
  6. Evaluating Web Pages - Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask
  7. Evaluating Web Pages - Duke University
  8. Evaluating Web Pages - Southern Illinois University
  9. The Good, The Bad & The Ugly - or, Why It's a Good Idea to Evaluate Web Sources
  10. Quality Information Check List -a resource to help young people evaluate the information they find on the Internet.
  11. Teaching Zack to think (from Alan November) - it is essential that students learn how to validate information.

(19) Evaluation - The student evaluates his/her own writing and the writings of others.

(A)  apply criteria to evaluate writing

 
(B)  respond in constructive ways to others' writings
 
(C)  evaluate how well his/her own writing achieves its purposes
 
(D)  analyze published examples as models for writing
 
(E)  review a collection of written works to determine its strengths and weaknesses and to set goals as a writer
 

(20) Inquiry/Research - The student uses writing as a tool for learning and research.

(A)  frame questions to direct research

 
(B)  organize prior knowledge about a topic in a variety of ways such as by producing a graphic organizer
  1. Concept Maps Explained - Concept maps and story webs are visual ways to structure ideas. (sample included
  2. Five main types of organizers - links showing examples of many types
  3. Graphic Organizers - from Enchanted Learning
  4. Graphic Organizers from Education Place These are Adobe Acrobat documents
  5. Index of Graphic Organizers - from Inspiration
  6. Instructions on how to use Excel to create a graphic organizer
  7. Take Notes - students evaluate what items should be included in the opening paragraph of a news story
(C)  take notes from relevant and authoritative sources such as guest speakers, periodicals, and on-line searches
  1. The ABC's of Web Site Evaluation (presented by Kathy Schrock) - Evaluation of Web sites is an important skill to learn in this age of digital and information literacy. Students and teachers need practice in critically examining sites to determine authority, authenticity, and applicability to purpose. This site provides that practice.
  2. Critical Evaluation of Resources - In the research process you will encounter many types of resources including books, articles and web sites. But not everything you find on your topic will be suitable. How do you make sense of what is out there and evaluate its authority and appropriateness for your research?
  3. Critically Analyzing Information Sources - the emphasis here is on print sources
  4. Evaluation of information sources - This page contains pointers to criteria for evaluating information resources, particularly those on the Internet.
  5. Evaluating Information Found on the Internet - a thoughtful guide to evaluating web and other Internet resources
  6. Evaluating Web Pages - Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask
  7. Evaluating Web Pages - Duke University
  8. Evaluating Web Pages - Southern Illinois University
  9. The Good, The Bad & The Ugly - or, Why It's a Good Idea to Evaluate Web Sources
  10. Quality Information Check List -a resource to help young people evaluate the information they find on the Internet.
  11. Teaching Zack to think (from Alan November) - it is essential that students learn how to validate information.
(D)  summarize and organize ideas gained from multiple sources in useful ways such as outlines, conceptual maps, learning logs, and timelines
 
(E)  present information in various forms using available technology
 
(F)  evaluate his/her own research and frame new questions for further investigation
 
(G)  follow accepted formats for writing research, including documenting sources
 

(21) Connections - The student interacts with writers inside and outside the classroom in ways that reflect the practical uses of writing.

(A)  collaborate with other writers to compose, organize, and revise various types of texts, including letters, news, records, and forms

 
(B)  correspond with peers or others via e-mail or conventional mail
 
(C)  identify challenges faced by published authors and strategies they use to compose various types of text
 

Viewing/Representing

(22) Interpretation - The student understands and interprets visual images, messages, and meanings.

(A)  describe how illustrators' choice of style, elements, and media help to represent or extend the text's meanings

 
(B)  interpret important events and ideas gathered from maps, charts, graphics, video segments, or technology presentations
  1. EASE History (created by a group at Michigan State University) - Through the prism of US presidential campaign ads, users can better understand the complexities of campaign issues and their historical context by looking at historical events, and explore the meanings of core values by examining how these values have been applied in both historical events and campaign ads
(C)  use media to compare ideas and points of view
 

(23) Analysis - The student analyzes and critiques the significance of visual images, messages, and meanings.

(A)  interpret and evaluate the various ways visual image makers such as illustrators, documentary filmmakers, and political cartoonists represent meanings

  1. Bob Miller's Light Walk - Artist Bob Miller's "Light Walk" at the Exploratorium is always an eye-opening experience for students and teachers alike. His unique discoveries will change the way you look at light, shadow, and images
  2. EASE History (created by a group at Michigan State University) - Through the prism of US presidential campaign ads, users can better understand the complexities of campaign issues and their historical context by looking at historical events, and explore the meanings of core values by examining how these values have been applied in both historical events and campaign ads
  3. Every Picture Tells a Story - (5-12) These activities are designed to create a sense of disequilibrium in the visual perception of students to make them aware of different ways to to view a picture. The students will view the images, decide what they see in each, record their ideas, and write a story based upon these findings. 
  4. Learning to Look - What's wrong with this picture? Ask your students to examine a 1942 mural to try to determine what's not right about the image.
  5. Learning to Look - An Introduction - In this activity your students will be examining an object closely, forming some guesses about it, and then learning more to find out if they were right. A worksheet to print is also provided.
(B)  compare and contrast print, visual, and electronic media such as film with written story
 
(C)  evaluate the purposes and effects of various media such as film, print, and technology presentations
 
(D)  evaluate how different media forms influence and inform
 

(24) Production - The student produces visual images, messages, and meanings that communicate with others.

(A)  select, organize, or produce visuals to complement and extend meanings

  1. Using PowerPoint in an Integrated Technology Lesson - this Internet4Classrooms' module gives an assignment and students prepare a PowerPoint show about a topic they researched
(B)  produce communications using technology or appropriate media such as developing a class newspaper, multimedia reports, or video reports
(C)  assess how language, medium, and presentation contribute to the message
 

return to the top of the page
Return to Grade Level Skills

Custom Search


Visitors since November 2000
Internet4Classrooms is a collaborative project developed by Susan Brooks and Bill Byles