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CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.3 Describe How A...

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.3 - Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.

 
Authors: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers

Title: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.3 Describe How A Particular Story's Or Drama's Plot... Reading:Literature - 6th Grade English Language Arts Common Core State Standards

Publisher: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington D.C.

Copyright Date: 2010

(Page last edited 10/10/2013)

  1. Action Is Character: Exploring Character Traits with Adjectives - In this lesson, students analyze the character while also enriching their vocabulary by "becoming" a character in a novel they have read and making lists from that character's perspective.
  2. Book Reviews, Annotation, and Web Technology - Students work in groups to read and discuss a book, keeping track of their feelings and opinions about the book, as well as facts and quotations, as they read. After reading, each group goes through their notes on the book, marking items they want to include in a book review. They look at sample book reviews and discuss the common elements of book reviews. Next, each group works together to write a review of their book and use Web-authoring tools to publish the review onto a Web page. Students then decide which parts of their review they wish to annotate, with each student in the group responsible for one topic. Students research their topics, taking notes. Each student writes about his or her topic, including bibliographic information. The writings are then peer-reviewed by the group, published to the Web, and hyperlinked back to the group's book review.
  3. Character Development - Test Tutor - think about what the characters think, say and do and answer questions.
  4. Circle Plot Diagram - Interactive tool to chart a circle plot - a demonstration of how to use this tool given
  5. Doodle Splash: Using Graphics to Discuss Literature - As students read a short story, they "doodle," either in a journal or using an online tool, responding to the text through images, symbols, shapes, and colors. They must be sure to represent all of the elements of the short story (setting, plot, character, point of view, theme) in their doodles.
  6. Elements of Plot - Quia quiz - matching
  7. Elements of Plot - Quia quiz - fill in the blank
  8. Everyone Loves a Mystery: A Genre Study - Students examine story elements and vocabulary associated with mystery stories through Directed Learning–Thinking Activities and then track these features as they read mystery books from the school or classroom library.
  9. Fairy Tale Autobiographies - Students work together in small groups to read, discuss, and analyze fairy tales. After compiling a list of common elements, students collaborate on their own original fairy tales—based on events from their own lives or the lives of someone they know.
  10. He Said/She Said: Analyzing Gender Roles through Dialogue - This lesson has students brainstorm some gender stereotypes, find examples in popular culture, and discuss how the stereotypes affect their lives.
  11. Integrating Tech: Author's Viewpoint Book Creation - This lesson incoorporates the bookpress and Doodle Buddy app to recreate a familiar story from an author's point of view.
  12. Making Personal and Cultural Connections Using A Girl Named Disaster - This lesson is intended to help students experience both “efferent” (reading for information) and “aesthetic” (reading as a personal, emotional experience) responses to the story A Girl Named Disaster by Nancy Farmer.
  13. Methods of Characterization - Graphic chart for students
  14. Personality profile - Use this article as a guide to character personalities
  15. Plot Development - Article with example of how a plot is developed
  16. Plot Diagram - Interactive tool to chart beginning to ending of plot - a demonstration of how to use this tool given
  17. Plot Outline - Graphic chart for students
  18. Plot Structure: A Literary Elements Mini-Lesson - This lesson plan provides a basic introduction to Freytag's Pyramid and to the literary element of plot.
  19. Press Conference for Bud, Not Buddy - This lesson can be used after the reading of Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis. The lesson encourages students to use higher level thinking skills and asks them to examine different character perspectives. Students demonstrate comprehension of the story by actively involving themselves in group and whole-class discussions.
  20. Reading and Writing Workshop: Freak the Mighty - This unit revolves around Rodman Philbrick's Freak the Mighty. Lessons include teaching and practicing pre-, during, and after reading comprehension strategies.
  21. Story Character Homepage - Combine higher order thinking with creativity in this lesson that uses diamante poems to illustrate the phenomenon of cause and effect. Students define and identify instances of cause and effect to help them generate their own examples.
  22. The Craft of Short Fiction: Character - Short article about the types of characters in a story
  23. The Great Gilly Hopkins: Characterization and prediction - In this lesson, students will characterize the main characters of the novel, predict the outcomes of the novel based on prior knowledge, evidence from the text, and the peers' opinions, and compare/contrast their predictions with the outcome of the novel.
  24. What a Character! - Unit plan; Explore characters created by authors and identify personality traits. Apply these ideas to their own characters using language skills identified to convey these traits. [from the Internet Archive]
  25. Writing a Flashback and Flash-Forward Story Using Movies and Texts as Models - Students are introduced to examples of these devices through the film The Sandlot and/or illustrated books. Students are then asked to create a story that contains both flashback and flash-forward.
  26. You can customize the lesson, if desired, to promote reading any time of the year. - In this lesson, students first explore resumes using the internet. They then work as a class to construct a sample resume for a character in a book they have all read. Next, they explore want ads and online job sites for possible jobs for a character from a book they have read on their own. They write a letter of application and create a resume for their character for the selected job.

 

 

Internet4classrooms is a collaborative effort by Susan Brooks and Bill Byles.
 

  

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